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WFFT Wildlife Rescue Team: Rescued Rosy Released back into the Wild!!!

Yesterday was one of those good days for which the WFFT Team works so hard to achieve. A successful Rescue, Repair, Rehabilitate, and Release is a very rewarding part of our work. Isn’t the purpose of all this work to give back to nature what belongs to nature? Of course, this is possible only when humans have not damaged, traumatized, or even destroyed (physically or psychologically) beyond the point of no return.

Last November we were called by a human rescue team who help an adult female dusky langur (Trachypithecus obscurus), who was injured on a road, after being hit by a car (see her full story of Rosy here: https://www.wfft.org/wildlife-general/wfft-wildlife-rescue-team-langur-distress/).

After successful restorative surgery and a recovery for a few months at the WFFT Wildlife Hospital, Rosy was finally ready to be released back to the wild! Early yesterday morning, she has been lightly sedated to avoid any excessive stress during transport, a 4-hour trip. The WFFT Rescue Team went to meet the people who rescued Rosy not far from the spot of the accident in order to be able to release her the closest to her previous home and suitable habitat, where her family and other troop members live. Once the transport crate opened, our friend didn’t need to be asked twice; she disappeared in less than 5 seconds in the great green expanse that was facing her. We wish her a long and happy life, away from any more troubles.

Let’s not forget that despite specific road signs warning drivers about wildlife, every day, many animals, way less fortunate than Rosy, succumb to injuries caused by road accidents, as the human population grows the risks faced by wildlife increases. Run wild Rosie and stay out of trouble.

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