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Blind gibbon “Nee” will receive eye surgery in 2013

 

GOOD NEWS UPDATE!

Friday 8th of February 2013

Nee has just arrived from Chulalongkorn University and we have good news! The retina of one of the eyes of Nee is still functioning and full eye surgery can be done in the coming month. The after-care will be a difficult issue with eye-drops having to be administered every 4 hours. A special cage will need to be designed and build within the coming weeks. The chance of successful surgery is very high, but we need to be well prepared and equipped to handle Nee after surgery for at least 30 days. WFFT is determined to take this first eye-surgery on a blind gibbon ever to a successful ending.

Screen Shot 2013-02-08 at 5.49.45 PM

 

Stay updated!

 

 

“The original story of 1 January 2013”

Next month Nee will undergo eye surgery!

 

“Nee” is a gibbon we rescued 12 years ago, to be precise in June 2001. Nee was one of the first gibbons at WFFT. While Nee was kept as a pet for 8 years, not far from our rescue center, he was fed rice, food leftovers, sweets and even coca-cola. This caused him to suffer diabetes that we gradually got under control once he arrived at the wildlife rescue center.

Blind Nee2
(photo by Nicole Vooijs)

Nee got blind over the last years however, with no treatment or surgery available to us within Thailand. Good news came however last month when doctors and ophthalmologists from Chulalongkorn University visited our center and checked up on Nee. As Nee is blind in both eyes we never hoped to hear the good news that there might be a chance he might regain his eye-sight in one of his eyes. Yes, he might. We are fully aware that this is no guarantee at all, but with the term that he “might” have a chance we are happy for now.

We will update you next month.

 

GOOD NEWS UPDATE!

Friday 8th of February 2013

Nee has just arrived from Chulalongkorn University and we have good news! The retina of one of the eyes of Nee is still functioning and full eye surgery can be done in the coming month. The after-care will be a difficult issue with eye-drops having to be administered every 4 hours. A special cage will need to be designed and build within the coming weeks. The chance of successful surgery is very high, but we need to be well prepared and equipped to handle Nee after surgery for at least 30 days. WFFT is determined to take this first eye-surgery on a blind gibbon ever to a successful ending.

Stay updated!

 

 

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